We’ve talked about it in here, and they talk about it more in the ‘best of’… how Pete really does have a nose for the future. He consistently either has or recognizes a great idea. Only no one knows it but him. And, well, us, because of how we know how it turns out.

In the pilot, he suggests the ‘death wish’ idea that Don had vehemently dismissed, and everyone is horrified. But really, what do we think the symbolism behind Marlboro Country is?

He pitches the very excellent Bethlehem Steel tagline, the Backbone of America.

During a discussion about how to angle Israel tourism, Pete says, “Maybe we should try and exploit the danger, instead of fighting it. Travel as adventure.” This idea, while not being actively shot down by Don, was skimmed over.

He was the only one who liked the Volkswagen ad, which pissed everyone off. He recognizes the hip factor of Kennedy, calling him Elvis. The way I saw that, he wasn’t comparing the people, but the potential (and eventual) phenomenon of Kennedy to that of Elvis.

SEASON 2 SPOILER ALERT FROM THE PROMOS below the fold (more…)

Mo Ryan, the Chicago Tribune’s Watcher, has promo pictures up from season 2 (promo as in, they’re all standing there posing for the camera, not a shot of an episode). She also reviews the DVDs and reminisces about season 1:

The word that kept coming to mind as I watched the show again was “ambiguity.” Where the show truly shines is in putting its characters in situations that provoke a multitude of responses, some of them contradictory. Even though Weiner and the outstanding cast gave us good ideas of who these people were, sometimes what they said or did was shocking – but believable too.

(more…)

(Or, A Blog is Born.)

Hi.

So, I’m a little uncomfortable with this, because it may be crossing over into narcissistic. But I was over in TV Squad. TV Squad’s Bob Sassone has been a fan of and written about Mad Men since the beginning, and I used to follow his write-ups and comment. The show finally has its own category on the site, and Bob is now a reader of ours as well. (And watch for an interview over there with Rich Sommer in a few weeks. We’ll let you know.)

The thing about Basket of Kisses, as you basketcases know, is that we started it after Season One had aired. Pretty much, right after. The first post was basically Peggy? WTF??? only with a better title.

(Actually, pretty funny. I just glanced over at that first post so I could put in the hyperlink, and I absolutely ask the spelled out version of WTF. I am very freaking consistent.)

Okay so my point, and I will make one, and it in fact ties in with my being consistent… it turns out that looking at my profile page in TV Squad, I can (and now, so can you) view all my comments in one place. So, kind of mini-write-ups/reactions to S1 in progress. (more…)

In Hobo Code she was still a party girl (witness The Twist, and also ‘we all work so hard’). By Nixon vs. Kennedy, not only was she a tight-ass, but she had a reputation as such.

Ken: Draper has plenty of booze.

They look towards Peggy, working at her desk despite the party around her.

Ken: (continues) We could ask her to join us. That might soften her up.

So what happened?

Okay. In Hobo Code she finally gets to have sex with Pete again. And I’m sorry folks, goodness knows I am not a fan of Mr. Campbell, but it was kind of beautiful. Evidenced by the tenderness between them afterwards… even from him. (more…)

One thing that knocks me out on this show is the class distinctions.

Top of the list and most obvious (set up in the very first scene of the series) is white/black. The only blacks ever seen in the series, to date, have been in service roles; the busboy, elevator operator, household help, etc.

And the Jews… that’s almost a whole different hierarchy.

The women. It’s right there within that first conversation in Smoke, between Don and the busboy… Ladies love their magazines. And they both laugh; white and black, at the silly ladies and their silly magazines.

But what fascinates me is the secretaries. (more…)

Roberta did this research; we were wondering about Peggy’s access to the Pill (Enovid) in Smoke Gets In Your Eyes. We know that the episode takes place in March or April of 1960, but the FDA didn’t approve Enovid for contraceptive use until June 23, 1960. Could it be a goof? We didn’t think it was a goof, because it’s major, and they’re sooo careful. But there it was, approval on June 23, 1960.

Then Roberta found this:

On May 9, 1960, the FDA announced it would approve Enovid 10 mg for contraceptive use, which it did on June 23, 1960, by which time Enovid 10 mg had been in general use for three years during which time, by conservative estimate, at least half a million women had used it.

(more…)

(Tip of the hat for ProgGrrl, who saw it first.) EW.com has a full five pages of Mad Men coverage, including five hot pictures (the cover, a posed backyard shot that I find kind of annoying because it’s so posey, 2 of the ones that we were all scoopy with, and one from the same series, with Betty in that plaid dress, that I hadn’t seen before).

There’s juicy stuff here. Sterling Cooper is working on an airline campaign when a deadly plane crash out of Idlewild (the original name of Kennedy Airport), throws them into a panic. Based on the description, the date appears to be March 1, 1962.

Apparently, we’re not done with the secret identity storyline:

”Here’s the issue: Don Draper’s doing great. Dick Whitman, not so,” Weiner explains. ”And we shouldn’t stop worrying about Don being discovered. His wife doesn’t know. Will she find out? Does it matter? There’s also this whole chunk of his life that we don’t know about.”

(more…)