In Hobo Code she was still a party girl (witness The Twist, and also ‘we all work so hard’). By Nixon vs. Kennedy, not only was she a tight-ass, but she had a reputation as such.

Ken: Draper has plenty of booze.

They look towards Peggy, working at her desk despite the party around her.

Ken: (continues) We could ask her to join us. That might soften her up.

So what happened?

Okay. In Hobo Code she finally gets to have sex with Pete again. And I’m sorry folks, goodness knows I am not a fan of Mr. Campbell, but it was kind of beautiful. Evidenced by the tenderness between them afterwards… even from him. (more…)

Eme commented on another post about the appeal of the Mad Men as grownups:

The fact that the men are supposed to be real adult men. Yes, I know that when we discuss these things we realize the real adolescent immaturity at (the) heart of the MM men but nevertheless, doesn’t MM in a way celebrate a culture of sophisticated adulthood? Personally, I’m just dying for a grown man to show up onscreen…

This reminded me of something Matthew Weiner said (back at that thing we saw him speak at where we met him and stuff) about how one thing that drives the characters forward is each of their struggles with where they are in their life cycle. That keeping that ‘real’ (no way did Weiner say “keeping anything real”) was how he could guarantee that this series never run dry, or need to rely on over-the-top plot devices. (more…)

There’s just been so much going on, so I figure it’s time for a little roundup.

Interesting (and by interesting I mean, thematically confusing) article in today’s the Independent (London), featuring Mad Men. Peter York has a few thoughts on the media’s (and its consumers) obsession with nostalgia.

There’s always been a re-model urge in the sampling culture – right from Run DMC and Aerosmith walking that way, with its coarsely ironic mock-the-rocker sub-text. But increasingly there’s the urge to get it right too, to catch the shimmering moment and recreate the mindset. Before destroying it. In ‘Madmen’, everything looks lovely and everyone behaves appallingly, they’re snobbish, racist, anti-Semitic, homophobic, the works.

Mad Men wins a Peabody. And while many other fine shows won as well, the article by Maureen Ryan over at the Watcher (Chicago Tribune) features a photograph of Mad Men. Maureen Ryan who, as it turns out, thinks Basket of Kisses is The Shit.

It was announced that Mad Men will be coming to Blu-Ray. Whatever that means. But the Season One DVD release date of July 1st was confirmed. You know, the date that we announced awhile back to the sound of much skepticism.

TV Guide’s Matt Roush brags about his insider status at the Paley event, where the cast and Matt Weiner spoke (hey this article features an awesome video clip montage from the event). Matt (Roush, not Weiner) misspells Sterling (as in, Stirling Cooper/Roger Stirling).

AMC’s Mad Men blog features a Q&A with Aaron Staton, who plays Ken Cosgrove, and one with Andy Umberger, who plays Dr. Wayne.

They’ve also done a fascinating piece on Peggy’s weight transformation.

We told you all about how Mad Men’s fashions were featured in the Huffington Post.

And in some ways the most exciting, BoK anonymously received a description of the planned opening sequence of Season Two, Episode One.

Not gonna lie, we are busy busy busy for a blog about a show that’s only on in repeats!

This has been driving me crazy. I will state right now that I haven’t researched this… I suppose the trick would be to find a book cover from 1960 of Exodus, or even some other best seller from the period that was re-issued while the movie based on it was in production. For my purposes, to find several books. Or print ads for those books.Because in Babylon, when Lily Meyer slides Exodus across the conference room table and over to Don, she tells him that it is “soon to be a major motion picture”. And she says it with the quotation marks as part of her inflection; she is lifting a popular phrase.

My gut, and my gut alone, tells me that turning this kind of phrase was not commonplace. That even if the industry was using it, people were not. People just didn’t lift catch-phrases the way they do today. Especially people to whom English is a second language. I really don’t think that started until the 70’s; I believe it to be a post-modern phenomenon, and in 1960 we were just broaching modern.

Now, Deborah suggests that perhaps she was directly quoting, and not being ironic. Maybe that’s it. But I don’t see why she would be inclined to directly quote rather than rephrase.  (more…)